Courses

Course ID and Name Course Description
AIS 431A/531A - Traditional Ecological Knowledge

An introduction to the growing literature on traditional ecological knowledge and its relationships to the ecological and social sciences.

AIS 502 - Dynamics of Indian Societies

Historic overview of philosophies, institutions, and characteristics of Indian societies, and indigenous constructions of historic knowledge.

AIS 513 - Ethnology of the Southwest

Culture, history and economic, social, and religious institutions of the living people of the Southwest. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.

AIS 515 - American Indians and the Urban Experience

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications. Graduate-level requirements include to present a 15-20 page research paper as opposed to a 5-8 page term paper. Graduate students will also be graded on a total of 500 points as opposed to 250 points

AIS 516 - Contemporary Indian America

The historical development and contemporary significance of the life of the Native American of the United States.

AIS 518 - Southwest Land and Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth familiarity with a subfield of choice through preparation of a substantial research paper (15-25 pages) and submission of weekly critical memos on required readings.

AIS 521 - Ethnology North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures. Graduate-level requirements include an oral presentation and a research paper.

AIS 523 - Anthropology of Rural Mexico

Historical and cultural background, and contemporary economic, political and social organization of indigenous and non-indigenous groups in rural Mexico. Primarily concerned with the people of the countryside, and the Mexican revolution. Graduate-level requirements include graduate students to read and critique graduate readings as well as 10 ethnohistories/ethnographies of Mexico of their choice (approved by instructor) as part of their biweekly memo readings.

AIS 524 - Studies in Southwest Literature

We will study texts representative of the region we now call the American Southwest and concern ourselves with the following questions: What cultural and literary traditions did their makers work within? How did they transcend those traditions? What is the relationship between physical landscapes and imagined cultural geographies in these narratives? How is the "Southwest" represented as a region in each? Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper.

AIS 525 - Native Economic Development

This course examines the issues surrounding economic development as indigenous peoples and their respective organizations enter the 21st Century. The course will cover a broad range of issues including sovereignty, constitutional reform and by-law development, cultural preservation, securitization of resources, intellectual property, religious freedom, health, social welfare and education.

AIS 526A - Principles of Indigenous Economics

Indigenous and aboriginal peoples in the Americas developed distinctive economic systems prior to contact with Europe. As the world economic system developed, indigenous peoples attempted to preserve their ways of life as best they could, with some success. This course examines the ontological, epistemological and moral principles of indigenous economic theory with application to contemporary problems.

AIS 535 - Mexican Traditional Medicine: An Overview of Indigenous Curing Cultures

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness. Graduate-level requirements include projects with deeper analysis, additional three sessions to discuss their research projects, and research paper weighted twice as heavy as the undergraduate paper, with greater expectations in research, writing and analysis.

AIS 541A - Natural Resource Management in Native Communities

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change. Graduate-level requirements include Increased length of writing assignments.

AIS 545A - Structures of Non-Western Languages

In-depth linguistic analysis of selected phonological, syntactic, and semantic problems in a non-Western language, concentrating on native languages of the Southwest area. Graduate-level requirements include a higher level of performance.

AIS 548 - Research Design and Methodology

This integrative course is designed to help students become professional and ethical researchers who produce the highest quality scholarship. The identification of significant research problems and the choice of appropriate and rigorous methodologies and techniques will be discussed. Students will gain experience in formulating a research problem that is theoretically important to American Indian Studies, well focused, and can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Special attention will be given to formulating a realistic Master's thesis project.

AIS 549A - Folklore

Forms of verbal and non-verbal folklore and material culture.

AIS 565 - Tribal Colleges

This course provides an introduction to the tribal colleges, which includes a discussion of their history, mission, governance, organization, finance, curriculum, and current challenges. It also includes student characteristics and support services, faculty characteristics, support services, roles, responsibilities and evaluation, and an introduction to assessment of learning in the tribal college.

AIS 571B - Space: A Social Cultural View/American Indian Landscape and Architecture

Examine American Indian landscape and architecture as social space, contrasting the traditional with the contemporary. The majority of students will come from AIS, Anthropology, Geography, Education, and elsewhere, with a smaller number from design fields. Graduate-level requirements include in-depth written discussions and in-depth paper or design projects applying the course content to some actual social setting.

AIS 575 - Contemporary Federal Indian Policy

This course will examine the current legal and political relationship between the United States government and American Indian tribes and individual Indians. The social, political, and legal circumstances of American Indians will be considered through the examination of legislation, court cases, and policies of federal, state and local, and tribal governments. The course will consist of lectures, group, and individual analyses of pertinent court cases and federal legislation as they pertain to the subject for the week. Students will be required to brief all cases included in substance in the assigned reading, including all cases underlined in the syllabus. These briefs will be turned in on the day the material is discussed. Case briefs and the oral participation of students in the class discussion will be an important component of the class participation grade. An essential aspect of the course will be an oral presentation of a case by individual student presenters

AIS 576 - Creative Writing for Native American Communities

For members of Native American communities and individuals working within such communities who are interested in producing new and authentic works in various genre including biography, autobiography, poetry, essay and translation and interpretation of collected tribal texts. Writing in the native language will be strongly encouraged.

AIS 577 - Studies in American Indian Literature

In-depth study of works by and/or about American Indian writers.

AIS 584 - Development of Federal Indian Policy

European colonial precedents through the treaty-making period; federal policy from treaty-making to the present.

AIS 585 - American Indian Gaming

This course will examine the anthropology and history of gaming in American Indian tribes and cultures. It will examine the legal framework of Indian gaming, including the history of federal Indian law as it relates to gaming, tribal jurisdiction over Indian land, compacting, legal struggles between the tribes and the states, and the history and development of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. The class will also examine the sociological impact of gaming on tribal communities and the effect of gaming revenues on neighboring communities. The student will develop skills in an analytical approach to discussion and writing, through lectures and group analysis of pertinent court cases and legislation, pertinent films and guest speakers, possible field trips, and readings as they pertain to the subject for the week. Graduate-level requirements include longer research papers and longer class presentations.

AIS 589 - Areal Survey of Native North American Languages

The field of native North American linguistics; areal and genetic classifications; how the study of particular languages provides insights into theories of linguistic anthropology and general linguistics. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and longer term papers.

AIS 595A - American Indian Studies

The exchange of scholarly information on important disciplinary topics, usually in a small group seminar setting with occasional lectures. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of results through discussion, reports, reviews, and/or papers.

AIS 596H - American Indian Law and Policy

The development and exchange of scholarly information on critical theoretical and practical issues in American Indian law, policy and government, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 596M - Studies in the Oral Tradition

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 596V - Issues in Native American Art

This course examines the various theoretical and methodological challenges inherent to the study of indigenous art, including the issues of identity, sovereignty, cultural critique and the role of the artist.  In addressing the interdisciplinary nature of the field, students will seek to find strategies in approaching their own research.

AIS 597A - Descriptive Linguistics for Native American Languages

Workshop includes methods and techniques on how to describe a language in the four basis sub-areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics; terminology and general processes associated with the four sub-areas.

AIS 602 - Interdisciplinary Research: Theory and Methods

Survey of important theoretical perspectives and their associated qualitative methodologies in American Indian studies. Overview of selected disciplinary frameworks of inquiry, discussions of case studies, and student exercises in choosing and implementing appropriate qualitative research methods.

AIS 603 - Nation Building

This course will explore critical nation-building issues confronting indigenous peoples in North America, with a primary focus on Native peoples in the United States. The course will examine multi-dimensional settings that confront Native societies and their social, cultural, political, educational, and economic leaders. The issues to be analyzed, include: education (formal and informal) from both contemporary and historical contexts, economic development, culture and identity; and leadership and institution-building. Issues, concepts, and theories examined in the course will provide a basis for examining current Native institutions of self-government; assessing educational policies of federal, First Nation/tribal, and state/provincial governments; analyzing how to enhance the foundational capacities for effective governance and for strategic attacks on education, economic, and community development problems of Native nations; and augmenting leadership skills, knowledge, and abilities for nation-building. Course participants will link concepts of education and culture, with nation-building and leadership through readings, discussions, short assignments, and a final research paper.

AIS 631B - Tribal Courts & Tribal Law

No description available, please contact the Law department for more information.

AIS 631C - Taxation in Indian Country

This course will examine the leading Native American tax cases. One-third of the class will address the policy, legal, and regulatory framework surrounding Native taxation including a case study of the Navajo Tax Commission. Two-thirds of the class will cover federal taxation of members and tribes, special federal rules, fishing rights, Indian Tax Status Act, tribal bonds, rapid depreciation rules, Indian jobs credit, and special rules for gaming; state taxation of tribes, members, and non-members and tribal taxation. Finally, a brief comparative analysis will be made with respect to taxation and First Nations in Canada.

AIS 631D - Law, Policy, and Economics of Development in Indian Country

This course examines the development challenges faced by contemporary Native nations. Utilizing numerous case studies and extensive research on what is working and what is not working to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of American Indian nations, the course emphasizes themes applicable to community development worldwide. Historical and relevant federal Indian policy and case law are used as background material, but the course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the "nation building" revolution underway in Indian Country. Additional emphasis is placed on how tribal initiatives can conflict with federal case law, state jurisdiction, and federal policies and politics.

AIS 631F - Who Owns Native Culture?

This course examines cultural heritage protection and the redefinition of indigenous peoples' heritage as a proprietary resource. Discussion will include select case law, the ethical and economic issues raised by the worldwide circulation of indigenous art, music, and biological knowledge, and the fundamental dichotomy of heritage as a protected resource within a multicultural society.

AIS 646 - Ancient and Contemporary Voices

The connections between ancient and contemporary native literature of North and South America.

AIS 676 - Exploring Critical Issues in Native American Curriculum Development

This course will explore, for curriculum development purposes, critical educational issues confronting Indigenous peoples, with a primary focus on Native Americans in the United States. Attention will also be given to the educational experiences of Aboriginal peoples of Canada. The course will provide an overview of Indigenous education (formal and informal) from both contemporary and historical contexts. The course will analyze Indigenous educational philosophies; history of Native education; contemporary educational, cultural, identity, institutional, and leadership challenges facing Native peoples; and ideas of place, community, and culture in education for and about Native peoples. Issues, concepts, and theories examined in the course will provide a basis for developing curriculum; assessing educational policy; augmenting teaching strategies; and examining learning practices in elementary, secondary, and higher educational institutions. Course participants will link concepts of Indigenous ways of knowing and teaching, and context and culture through readings, discussions, short assignments, and a final paper or project.

AIS 677 - History of American Indian Education

Educational philosophies, policies, and practices of native people, European missions, and federal schools. Historic overview of Indian education to early 1900s.

AIS 678 - Contemporary American Indian Education and Research

Contemporary American Indian/Alaskan native education in two parts: (1) the current state of native education and its effectiveness in meeting the needs of native students; (2) current research in the area of American Indian/Alaskan native education and its implications for future research.

AIS 679 - American Indian Higher Education

Development of higher education for American Indians/Alaskan natives from the earliest efforts to contemporary times. Issues and their implications for the education of American Indians in institutions and agencies of higher education. Emphasis on tribally controlled colleges and universities, and the development of American Indian studies programs in higher education institutions.

AIS 695A - Special Topics in American Indian Studies

The development and exchange of scholarly information on critical, holistic, theoretical, and practical issues in American Indian Studies, usually in a small group setting. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through extensive discussions, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 696C - Societies and Culture

The development and exchange of scholarly information on critical theoretical and practical issues about American Indian contemporary and historic societies and cultures, usually in a small seminar setting. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 696D - Indigenous Peoples Law Clinic

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 696E - American Indian Education

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 696F - Literature and Creative Writing

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 696J - Topics in Native American Languages and Linguistics

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting examining in depth topics in Native American Languages and Linguistics. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 697A - College Teaching Methods

The practical application of theoretical and student-centered learning within various classroom settings. The class involves an exchange of ideas about theory, goals, values, and ethical concerns for teaching courses concentrating on American Indians and provide training in practical methods, teaching strategies, and action-learning skills in a lecture and seminar format. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers. Students will begin to accumulate materials for a teaching portfolio.

AIS 697B - Globalization and Preservation of Culture

Workshop on globalization and preservation of culture.

AIS 697C - Research Design for American Indian Communities

The practical application of theoretical learning within a group setting and involving an exchange of ideas and practical methods, skills, and principles.

Law 696C - Clinical Practice

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 102 - Linguistics for Native American Communities

Introduction to descriptive linguistics for Native Americans; practical linguistic and social issues in Native American languages; phonetics and phonology; orthography; dialects and language change; classroom applications.

AIS 104A - Beginning Navajo

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical information is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.

AIS 104B - Beginning Navajo

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical information is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.

AIS 160A1 - Introduction to Oncology Careers for Native Americans

Introduction to careers in oncology-related professions relevant to needs of Native Americans. Interactive discussion sessions with professionals and students in oncology careers to Native American students. Emphasis on cultural relevance to Native Americans.

AIS 160A1 - Non-Western Cultures and Civilizations - Many Nations of Native America

Historical development and fundamental concepts of a nonwestern culture. Examines how members of a particular culture are shaped by a distinct heritage of ideas, values, and artistic expressions that may be in sharp contrast to traditional western ideas and values.

AIS 197A - First Year Scholars Success Course

The First-Year Scholars Program (FYSP) is a freshmen retention program offered through the Native American Student Affairs (NASA) office at The University of Arizona. It is designed to increase the retention rates of freshmen Native American students at the university by providing academic, social, and cultural activities that allow students to learn tools and resources that can contribute to their overall academic excellence and success in college. The purpose of the course is to help the First-Year Scholar Program participants build a foundation for success in their academic work by providing a structured location that meets on a weekly basis so that students can learn academic success strategies through workshops, presentations, and self-reflection. Expected Learning Curves *Students will learn about their own personal development through completing the CSI and meeting with Program Manager to discuss results. *Students will learn how to interact with Professors/Instructors by requesting progress reports to be completed. *Students will learn about different opportunities and resources that are available from guest speakers, presenters, and workshops throughout semester. *Students will learn how to work with Retention Specialist/Tutors in recognizing strategies to help students improve their academic ability.

AIS 197B - First Year Scholars Success Course

The First-Year Scholars Program (FYSP) is a freshmen retention program offered through the Native American Student Affairs (NASA) office at The University of Arizona. It is designed to increase the retention rates of freshmen Native American students at the university by providing academic, social, and cultural activities that allow students to learn tools and resources that can contribute to their overall academic excellence and success in college. The purpose of the course is to help the First-Year Scholar Program participants build a foundation for success in their academic work by providing a structured location that meets on a weekly basis so that students can learn academic success strategies through workshops, presentations, and self-reflection.

AIS 200 - Introduction to American Indian Studies

This course introduces student to various approaches and theories involved in American Indian studies. Intended for those minoring in American Indian studies, courses serve as basis for further upper division course work. Provides overview of tribes in U.S. their languages, histories, cultures. Large component focuses on colonialism and U.S. policy toward Native Americans and its affect within Native communities.

AIS 201 - Topics in Cancer Among Native Americans

Interactive discussion of current biomedical literature relative to cancer in Native Americans.

AIS 202A - Introduction to Laboratory Methods in Cancer Biology

Basic research theory and methodology using cancer in Native Americans as a model topic. Topics include laboratory protocol, record keeping, calculations, safety, and research ethics. Part of a four-semester pre-health profession curriculum for Native American students.

AIS 204A - Intermediate Navajo

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.

AIS 204B - Intermediate Navajo

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.

AIS 210 - American Indian Languages

This course surveys American Indian languages and the communities that speak them, focusing on a representative sample for closer study. The role of language in maintaining cultural identity is examined, and prospects for the future of American Indian languages are assessed.

AIS 220 - Contemporary American Indian Issues

This course introduces student to various approaches and theories involved in American Indian studies. Intended for those minoring in American Indian studies, course serves as basis for further upper division course work. Provides overview of current issues affecting tribes in U.S. Large component focuses on contemporary U.S. policy toward Native Americans and its affect within Native communities.

AIS 248A - Introduction to Folklore

Forms of verbal folklore.

AIS 278 - American Indian Literature

Works by and/or about American Indian writers.

AIS 279 - Oral Tradition

A study of oral tradition, with an emphasis on American Indian myth, legend and lore.

AIS 295A - American Indian Studies

An analysis of historical and current issues affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives. Topics may vary and will focus on the exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Topic areas will be discussed within the framework of federal treaties with tribal nations, the federal trust relationship, sovereignty and self-determination, federal Indian policies, jurisdiction and federal tribal recognition, and Indian identity.

AIS 307A - Elementary O'Odham Language

Speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'Odham (Papago) language.

AIS 307B - Elementary O'Odham Language

Speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'odham (Papago) language.

AIS 330A - Interpreting Native Cultures

Students learn about the history and culture of Native American tribes and gain familiarity with museum education methods. Through the required concurrent Internship 393, they learn about museum interpretation philosophy and methods, and conduct tours of ASM's Paths of Life exhibition for K-12 fieldtrip groups.

AIS 336 - History and Philosophy of the Dine People

A study of events in Dine history in relation to the political, societal and economic context of American history. A review of Dine philosophical and world views, examination of the history and federal Indian policy as applied to the Dine. Interactive in nature.

AIS 344 - Native Americans in Film

Survey of images of American Indians in cinema, particularly commercial films. Examines differences between the "western" and the "Indian" film and how imagery affects attitudes and policy-making.

AIS 346 - Clovis to Coronado: Archaeology of the Southwest

Investigates native inhabitants of the US Southwest from its initial colonization over 11,000 years ago to the arrival of Europeans in AD 1540. Surveys past societies of the Southwest, including where they lived, their lifeways, and their material culture.

AIS 347 - Native Peoples of the Southwest

Explores societies and cultures of Native peoples of the US Southwest and Northern Mexico from European contact to present. Examines impact of Spain, Mexico, and the United States on these Native peoples. Discusses major contemporary issues facing Native peoples in the area.

AIS 396H - Honors Proseminar

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

AIS 413 - Ethnology of the Southwest

Culture, history and economic, social, and religious institutions of the living people of the Southwest.

AIS 415 - American Indians and the Urban Experience

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications.

AIS 418 - Southwest Land and Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time.

AIS 421 - Ethnology of North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures.

AIS 423 - Anthropology of Rural Mexico

Historical and cultural background, and contemporary economic, political and social organization of indigenous and non-indigenous groups in rural Mexico. Primarily concerned with the people of the countryside, and the Mexican revolution.

AIS 424 - Studies in Southwest Literature

We will study texts representative of the region we now call the American Southwest and concern ourselves with the following questions: What cultural and literary traditions did their makers work within? How did they transcend those traditions? What is the relationship between physical landscapes and imagined cultural geographies in these narratives? How is the "Southwest" represented as a region in each?

AIS 431A/531A - Traditional Ecological Knowledge

An introduction to the growing literature on traditional ecological knowledge and its relationships to the ecological and social sciences.

AIS 434 - Tribal Government

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the development of modern tribal governments, their powers, and the problems they face. Course requires a historical examination of North American indigenous societies from Pre-colonial times to the present. Indigenous groups prior to 1492 will be examined. Emphasis on traditional social and political institutions and practices. Historical development of Indian-Anglo relations, European contact to present, U.S. Indian policy, tribal sovereign powers, political economic and cultural implications toward tribal societies.

AIS 435 - Mexican Traditional Medicine: An Overview of Indigenous Curing Cultures

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness.

AIS 441A - Natural Resource Management in Native Communities

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change.

AIS 445A - Structure of Non-Western Language

In-depth linguistic analysis of selected phonological, syntactic, and semantic problems in a non-Western language, concentrating on native languages of the Southwest area.

AIS 449 - Folklore

Forms of verbal and non-verbal folklore and material culture.

AIS 450 - American Indian Women

Interdisciplinary exploration of new information available on American Indian women, especially materials written by Indian women and investigation of the status, experience, and contributions of American Indian women from pre-contact to contemporary times.

AIS 467 - Race and Ethnic Relations

Social processes involved in minority groups in terms of race, caste, class, ethnicity, politics, and religion.

AIS 471B - Space: A Social Cultural View/American Indian Landscape and Architecture

Examine American Indian landscape and architecture as social space, contrasting the traditional with the contemporary. The majority of students will come from AIS, Anthropology, Geography, Education, and elsewhere, with a smaller number from design fields.

AIS 477 - Studies of Native American Literature
AIS 485 - American Indian Gaming

This course will examine the anthropology and history of gaming in American Indian tribes and cultures. It will examine the legal framework of Indian gaming, including the history of federal Indian law as it relates to gaming, tribal jurisdiction over Indian land, compacting, legal struggles between the tribes and the states, and the history and development of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. The class will also examine the sociological impact of gaming on tribal communities and the effect of gaming revenues on neighboring communities. The student will develop skills in an analytical approach to discussion and writing, through lectures and group analysis of pertinent court cases and legislation, pertinent films and guest speakers, possible field trips, and readings as they pertain to the subject for the week.

AIS 489 - Areal Survey of Native North American Languages

The field of native North American linguistics; areal and genetic classifications; how the study of particular languages provides insights into theories of linguistic anthropology and general linguistics.

AIS 495A - American Indian Studies

The exchange of scholarly information on important disciplinary topics, usually in a small group seminar setting with occasional lectures. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of results through discussion, reports, reviews, and/or papers.

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences