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Teachers of American Indian Preschool Students Diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect: Training, Experience, and Recommendations

Abstract: (Excerpt from Introduction)
The objective of this thesis is to examine how preschool teachers are trained to recognize and education American Indian children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) or Fetal Alcohol Effect (FAE). The research questions that frame this study are:

  • Are preschool teachers being trained to recognize and work with American Indian children with FAS or FAE?
  • What type of training is being done to teach preschool teachers of American Indian children about FAS or FAE?
  • What type of teaching strategies are preschool teachers using to teach American Indian children with FAS or FAE?

A 24-item questionaire was designed to determine whether or not preschool teachers are being trained to recognize and work with Native children who are alcohol affected, and how they are being trained. One notable limitation of this study was the small sample size, i.e., the number of questionnaires returned. Because the sample was so small it is important to be cautious when making any generalizations based on this research. Nonetheless, hopefully the research conducted in this thesis will assist future research in this area.

Author: 

Jennifer Montgomery

Chair: 

Mary Jo Tippeconnic Fox

Publication: 

thesis

Year: 

1999

Arizona State Museum: 

M9791 M86t
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences