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Timnakni Timat (Writing From The Heart): Sahaptin Discourse and Text in the Speaker Writing of Xiluxin

Abstract:
The unique contributions of speaker scholarship to the study of Sahaptian languages in the Columbia Plateau have rarely been considered a domain of inquiry in the field of linguistics. In the present study, I utilize a discourse-centered approach to investigate the ways in which an indigenous language is employed as a resource in the creation of texts. I examine the status of Sahaptin language use in a series of unpublished texts produced by X[dotbelow]ílux[dotbelow]in (Charlie McKay, 1910-1996), a multilingual Sahaptin speaker and scholar from the Umatilla Indian Reservation of northeastern Oregon. I account for the merging of internal indigenous linguistic forms with writing in two occurrences: language documentation and individual expression. The study found that, when a Sahaptin speaker writer transfers his or her internalized language to the written form, Sahaptin discourse and world view play a key role in its outcome.

Author: 

Phillip Cash Cash

Chair: 

Ofelia Zepeda

Publication: 

thesis

Year: 

2000

Arizona State Museum: 

M9791 C348

Proquest: 

AAT 1403175

UA Library: 

E9791 2000 389
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences