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As we work together to battle the coronavirus, we will continue to offer safe and secure online sessions . Even though the American Indian Studies office(s) are closed, in accordance with the guidelines recommended by CDC, we are working remotely and continuing to provide student, staff, and faculty assistance. We can be reached Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Mountain Standard Time at 520-626-8143, or by email to johncarbajal@arizona.edu.

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Raymond Austin

About Raymond Austin

Justice Raymond D. Austin is Diné (Navajo) from northeastern Arizona. He is the Distinguished Jurist in Residence for the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, James E. Rogers College of Law. Justice Austin received a B.S. from Arizona State University in 1979, earned a law degree (J.D.) from the University of New Mexico Law School in 1983, and, received a Ph.D. in American Indian Studies (Law and Policy Concentration) from the University of Arizona in 2007. 

Justice Austin is a member of the Navajo Nation Bar Association and the state bars of Arizona and Utah. Justice Austin served on the Navajo Nation Supreme Court from 1985 to 2001. Justice Austin also served as judge pro term on the Arizona Court of Appeals, Division I (1993-1994) and as solicitor to the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Court of Appeals (2005-2007). He served as the Herman Phleger Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the Stanford Law School in spring 1995. He has taught courses as visiting professor at the Harvard Law School, Arizona State University College of Law, and University of Utah College of Law. He has also taught seminars on Indian law and tribal law and judicial systems to members of the state bars of Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico and to other legal associations. He is a past member of the board of directors for the National Indian Justice Center, National American Indian Court Judges Association, and the Advisory Council on Indian Legal Programs at the Arizona State University College of Law.

Justice Austin's book, Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law, A Tradition of Tribal Self-Governance (University of Minnesota Press), became available in November 2009. Justice Raymond Austin has recently been in UA news regarding his new book "Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law, A Tradition of Tribal Self-Governance" Click here for details.

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Contact Information

Raymond Austin
Office Hours: By Appointment

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